Southern Norway

“The Norwegian Riviera”

Counties: Aust-Agder, Vest-Agder
Size of area:
16 492 km2
Population:
295 644
Major cities:
Kristiansand, Arendal
Majorattractions:
“The Norwegian Riviera”

With only a touch of hyperbole, we like to refer to this stretch of coast, with its grassy holms and skerries shielding the mainland from the harsh winds and waves of the Skagerrak, as “the Norwegian Riviera”.

Blessed with more sunny days per year than any whereelse in Norway, Sørlandet (“Southland”), comprising the two counties of Aust-Agder (East Agder) and Vest- Agder (West Agder), is a veritable holiday paradise. Even the tiniest communities seem to explode into life as their populations double several times over during the summer.

Vacation homes, hotels and pensions fill to capacity as Norwegians − and the more knowledgeable foreign visitors − descend on the region to swim, sail, scuba dive, fishfor crab and mackerel, or just sunbathe to the screams of the seagulls. Others wander inland for a spot of mountain climbing or river rafting.

Shipping was the original economic base for this region, producing generations of sailors fishermen and boat makers, and a traditional coastal culture that laid the foundation for Norway’s leading position in international shipping to this day.

“The Norwegian Riviera”

Counties: Aust-Agder, Vest-Agder
Size of area:
16 492 km2
Population:
295 644
Major cities:
Kristiansand, Arendal
Majorattractions:
“The Norwegian Riviera”

With only a touch of hyperbole, we like to refer to this stretch of coast, with its grassy holms and skerries shielding the mainland from the harsh winds and waves of the Skagerrak, as “the Norwegian Riviera”.

Blessed with more sunny days per year than any whereelse in Norway, Sørlandet (“Southland”), comprising the two counties of Aust-Agder (East Agder) and Vest- Agder (West Agder), is a veritable holiday paradise. Even the tiniest communities seem to explode into life as their populations double several times over during the summer.

Vacation homes, hotels and pensions fill to capacity as Norwegians − and the more knowledgeable foreign visitors − descend on the region to swim, sail, scuba dive, fishfor crab and mackerel, or just sunbathe to the screams of the seagulls. Others wander inland for a spot of mountain climbing or river rafting.

Shipping was the original economic base for this region, producing generations of sailors fishermen and boat makers, and a traditional coastal culture that laid the foundation for Norway’s leading position in international shipping to this day.

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